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Average UK Salaries

August 10, 2018 | By | No Comments

Good afternoon,

It’s Dan’s birthday tomorrow, so we’ve had a good Friday in the office with presents and cake. We hope he has a great day tomorrow and the rain holds off for his bbq!

This week for the blog, we are going to look at average salaries for the UK in a number of areas such as gender, number of years experience, city, and industry. It will be interesting to see how the salaries vary depending on different aspects.

The first set of information we are going to look at is the average salary in the UK by gender. On average the salary of a male is £30,523 whilst the average salary for a female is £25,288. The men’s average salary is quite a bit higher than the female’s, this could be down to a number of reasons, such as the type of position the individual holds, what industry they work in, and the location where the individual works.

The next graph we are going to look at, is the average UK annual salary against the number of years’ experience you have. From the graph, you can see the average salary gradually increasing as the number of years’ experience also increases, It ranges from an average salary being £20,459  with less than 1 year experience in that field, moving up to an average of £39,153 with 20 years or more.

The next graph is showing the average salary by industry. From the graph you can see that the finance sector is the highest, followed by IT Services and Software Development. IT has taken over possibly everything you can think of in today’s world and IT jobs are very high in demand and as they can be very niche and/or complicated they pay a high amount of money. Although the majority of the other industries are not that far behind, it shows that the IT industry is a good place to be.

The last graph we will be looking at is the average UK salary by city. There is not that much of a big difference comparing the majority of cities mentioned in the graph below, the only one that really stands out is London. This isn’t much of a surprise as London is known for paying a higher wage than other cities. Manchester, Bristol, Glasgow, Birmingham, and Edinburgh’s average salaries are very similar with not much of a difference, although Cambridge is in-between London and the other cities.

Looking through all of the graphs above, there are a number of reasons why salaries can vary, such as number of years experience, the sector you work in, and the location that you work. It is interesting to see how each aspect can make a difference.

Have a great weekend.

Warm Regards,

Sheree

 

Source: https://www.monster.co.uk/career-advice/article/uk-average-salary-graphs

 

Public Sector Workers get Pay Rise

July 27, 2018 | By | No Comments

Good afternoon,

How has the week been for everyone? It has been quite a quiet one for new roles this week, which is probably down to the next phase of transfer from Capita to Alexander Mann happening on Monday (30th July 2018), so we should start to see the roles picking back up again over the next couple of weeks when more of the government departments are transferred over.

In the news earlier this week, it was announced that 1 million public sector workers were going to receive their biggest pay rise in nearly 10 years.  The 1% pay cap of last year will be scrapped following campaigns by unions for higher wage rises.

The pay rises will include a 2.9% pay rise for the armed forces, 2.75% for prison officers, up to 3.5% for teachers and 2% rise for Police, GPs and dentists. Although, the pay rises for doctors and dentists will only apply in England, the pay rises for prison officers, teachers, and police officers will apply in England and Wales. The pay rise for the armed forces will apply throughout the whole of the UK. The individual departments will have to fund the pay rises rather than the money coming from the treasury. The government has said the increases are affordable within the spending plans.

The teachers’ pay deal means a rise of 3.5%, which is worth between £800 and £1,366 per year for teachers on the main pay range. Overall teachers in England and Wales will receive pay rises between 1.5% and 3.5%. For England the money will come from a grant from the existing Department for Education budgets and will receive £508m over two years, whereas in Wales, they will have to rely on money from the devolved government.

The pay rise for members of the armed forces is 2%, which is just under the 2.9% which was recommended by the Armed Forces’ Pay Review Body, but will be supplemented by a one off payment of 0.9%. It works out the average soldier will get £680 in pay and a one off payment of £300.

Prison workers will get an annual 2% pay rise with a one off payment of 0.75%, making it the total pay rise of 2.75%. Junior doctors, specialist documents, GPs and dentists will have an increase of at least 2%, with consultants getting a pay rise of 1.5%.

Pay rises in Scotland are different to England and Wales, whereas back in June the NHS staff in Scotland were offered a 9% pay rise spread across three years, although a 3% pay rise for teachers in Scotland was rejected by the unions earlier in the year.

Both the public and private sector have seen their pay rising, although the private sector has been growing more rapidly and over took the public sector back in 2014. The public sector pay froze for 2 years back in 2011, which was then followed by 1% caps. The public sector pay is still slowly increasing but not at the same speed as the private sector. It’s great to see the public sector pay rises happening, but it would be even better if the rises could be higher to keep up with the private sector.

Have a great weekend.

Warm regards,

Sheree

 

Sources: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-44933009

 

 

Employment Stats – July 2018

July 20, 2018 | By | No Comments

Good afternoon,

I hope everyone has had a good week and is looking forward to the weekend. It will be a quiet one on sport this weekend as the finals took place for Wimbledon and the World Cup last weekend, so can finally get back to some normal TV.

Earlier this week the new employment stats were released for the period of March – May 2018. So for the blog this week, we will be looking into the stats and how much they have changed in the last quarter and against last year’s.

32.4 million people were in work between March and May this year which is 137,000 more than the earlier quarter (Dec 2017 – Feb 2018) and 388,000 more than this time last year. The employment rate has gone up to 75.5% from 73.9% last year which is the highest since comparable records began in 1971.

1.41 million people were unemployed (people not in work but seeking and available to work) between March and May this year which is 12,000 less than for Dec 2017 – Feb 2018, and 84,000 less than a year earlier. The unemployment rate is the joint lowest since 1975 at 4.2% which was down from 4.5% last year.

Figure 1: The graph shows the quarterly and annual changes in the number of people in the UK market.

Source: Labour Force Survey, Office for National Statistics

Looking back to the year 1971 when records began, the employment rate for both Men and Women has changed quite significantly. The employment rate for men has dropped from 92.1% to 80.1%, whilst the employment rate for women has risen from 52.8% up to 71.3%, keeping the percentage for both men and women steady. This can be seen in the graph below.

Figure 2: UK Employment Rates Jan 1971 – May 2018

Source: Labour Force Survey, Office for National Statistics

The latest stats have also shown that the average weekly earnings for employees in Great Britain (adjusted for price inflation) increased since July 2017 by 0.4% excluding bonuses and by 0.2% including bonuses.

Over the past few years the employment rate is rising, along with the unemployment rate declining, which is great to see. Things are going in the right direction and we are seeing more people being in work every quarter. It will be interesting to see if this continues into the next quarter and if they improve going into 2019.

Have a great weekend.

Warm regards,

Sheree

 

Source: https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/employmentandemployeetypes/bulletins/uklabourmarket/latest

 

The NHS turns 70!

July 6, 2018 | By | No Comments

Good afternoon,

I hope everyone is still enjoying the warm weather. This week the NHS turned 70! The NHS has been in the news for the last few days celebrating the great service that has been provided for the last 70 years. The NHS has also been in the news over the last couple of weeks as NHS England is launching a massive recruitment drive to help attract more applicants for under staffed positions.

Last year there were 35,000 vacant nursing positions, so NHS England has launched a recruitment drive, the biggest in its history, to gain more interest in the positions. It will be specifically targeting 14-18 year olds to give them an understanding of what it takes to be a nurse. It should help inspire young workers to start their career in the NHS.

The recruitment drive will include TV adverts, radio adverts, posters, and posting on social media and will set out to attract 22,000 applicants. Although there are still some concerns, as last year there were cuts to student nurse and midwife bursaries, which left application numbers to drop by nearly 20%. The Royal College of Nursing also voiced their concern about working restrictions for EU and non-EU healthcare staff as it has stopped people from applying to work in the UK.

A similar issue has also risen to NHS staff in Wales. After Brexit a large number of doctors and nurses will be needed due to staff shortages, although in Wales, 2% of all NHS staff are from the European Union. Roughly 30% of 8,800 doctors received their training abroad with 6% being trained in EU countries. Although the numbers can seem low, there are areas for example eye specialists or ophthalmology where staff from the EU are relied on. To allow more doctors and nurses from outside the EU to come into the UK after Brexit, the UK government announced last month that they would be relaxing the immigration rules.

It will be interesting firstly to see how the recruitment drive does for NHS England and whether it brings in the amount of interest that it intended, also it will be interesting to see how the NHS will be affected after Brexit and whether the same amount of staff from the EU are being employed.

I hope you have a great weekend.

Warm Regards,

Sheree

 

Sources: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-politics-44703552

https://news.sky.com/story/staffing-crisis-prompts-nhs-recruitment-drive-11424490

 

Unique Job Titles in the UK

June 15, 2018 | By | No Comments

Good afternoon,

I hope everyone has had a good week. We are still continuing with the warm, sunny weather here in South Wales, with the odd bit of rain. I hope everyone else is still getting some sunny weather.

I came across an article earlier this week, which was on unique job titles that we have in the UK. I thought it would be quite interesting to share on the blog. Glassdoor have put together a list of the most unique and quirky job titles that now exist in 2018, which can be found below. There are a mixture of job titles, from technical, to scientific, to food related areas.

  1. Developer Evangelist
  2. Brow Expert
  3. Cloud Chief Architect
  4. Telemedicine Assistant
  5. Sandwich Artist
  6. Graduate BrainBox
  7. Listening Lead
  8. Beverage Application Technologist
  9. Python Developer
  10. Ethical Hacker
  11. Ruby Developer
  12. Party Chief
  13. Animal Technologist
  14. Protein Expression Scientist
  15. Waste Chemist
  16. Ramp Agent
  17. Nandoca

The technical jobs include a ‘Python Developer’ and a ‘Ruby Developer’. Python and Ruby are both associated with Programming. Or there is an ‘Ethical Hacker’, that tries to uncover any weaknesses in online systems. There is also a ‘Developer Evangelist’ that is a mediator between a company and its technical staff and outside developers.

Under the scientific section, there is an ‘Animal Technologist’ who is responsible for the care and welfare of laboratory animals used in scientific research and experiments. There is also ‘Protein Expression Scientist’ that involves cloning and testing engineered DNA constructs and develops bench scale protein purification methods. The ‘Waste Chemist’ would be working in an industrial laboratory managing and analysing waste material.

It also contains a few jobs in the food industry. There is now a position called a ‘Sandwich Artist’ which is a job of someone making sandwiches at Subway. Also if you work at Nando’s you are called a ‘Nandoca’.

There are a number of unique job titles out there today and we do get some of these roles through to recruit for, such as Python Developers and Ruby Developers, so keep an eye out on our open roles and you may see some of these unique job titles pop up.

Let us know in the comments below if you have ever had a job with a unique name, or if you have come across any quirky job titles throughout a job search.

Have a great weekend.

Warm Regards,

Sheree

 

Source: https://www.glassdoor.co.uk/blog/18-uncommon-quirky-uk-job-titles/

Contractor vs Government Dept – IR35 Case

June 1, 2018 | By | No Comments

Good afternoon,

I hope everyone had a good bank holiday last weekend. Even though we had some storms here in South Wales, all of us in the office still made the most of the extra day off.

For this week’s blog, we will be looking at the battle between a contractor and the HMRC over IR35, and how the contractor won the case against the HMRC for the contract to be declared outside of IR35 and raising questions of the Government’s understanding of IR35.

The contractor was providing Business Analyst services through a personal service company to the Department of Work and Pensions, where the contract was declared inside IR35. Although the contractor disagreed with this and took it further. After the hearing took place, the judge decided that the contract belonged outside IR35 as there was insufficient right of control over the working methods. The judge also disagreed with HMRC’s interpretation of mutuality of obligation (MOO) and the right of substitution.

The CEO of the company that represented the contractor at the hearing stated:  “Despite HMRC implementing and enforcing the rules, this verdict shows they can’t accurately assess a contractor’s IR35 status. The Government is serious about clamping down on what they believe to be non-compliance, but worryingly, can’t recognise whether a contractor belongs inside or outside IR35. That the individual was working on a Government project simply adds to the irony. This case is further proof that IR35 needs simplifying, and HMRC must rethink its IR35 strategy completely. Clearly, this is no time to extend public sector changes to the private sector”.

A large number of contractors are dismissing contracts due to them being inside IR35. If the government is mis-assessing the IR35 status of contracts and being incorrectly declared, not only are contractors missing out on opportunities, but the individual departments within the government departments are also missing out on good candidates.

If the judge has decided on this occasion that the contract should be outside IR35, how many other contractors are out there in the same position where their contracts have been declared inside IR35 but should rightfully be outside IR35. What is your opinion on this? If someone thinks their contract has been declared inside IR35 incorrectly, do you think it should be challenged? Let us know in the comments below.

I hope everyone has a great weekend.

Warm Regards,

Sheree

 

Source: https://www.journalism.co.uk/press-releases/ir35-freelancer-working-on-government-project-wins-hmrc-tax-battle/s66/a721977/

 

BT cutting 13,000 jobs

May 11, 2018 | By | No Comments

Good afternoon,

I hope everyone had a good bank holiday last weekend, we definitely had the weather for it. The team at EGB made the most of the sunny hot weather by having BBQs, going to the beach, visiting food festivals, and doing a bit of gardening. Let’s just hope that isn’t the last of the hot weather for this year.

This week for the blog, we are looking into the news that BT is to cut 13,000 jobs over the next three years to try and save money.

BT will be cutting down its workforce by around 12%, which is 13,000 jobs, a third of these being from outside the UK in its Global Services division. The cuts will come from reducing its management and back-office roles. Along with reducing jobs, BT headquarters will be moving to smaller premises after moving out of the existing headquarters building in Central London. These job cuts and other measures will help to save £1.5bn.

It didn’t help that back last year, BT’s Continental European operation resigned after years of inappropriate behaviour, writing down the value of the Italian unit by £530m, making BT’s shares plunge 21%. The investigation found improper accounting practices and “a complex set of improper sales, purchase, factoring and leasing transactions”.

BT forecasted a fall in revenue of about 2% for the 2018/2019 financial year. BT also said it was keeping its full-year dividend unchanged from last year at 15.4p a share and would freeze it for the next two years. George Salmon, equity analyst at Hargreaves Lansdown has said “The dividend, which was rising 10% a year not so long ago, is set to freeze for the foreseeable future, and next year’s profits look likely to fall again.”

BT have said “It was responding to changes in the telecoms market, including increasing competitive intensity from established companies and new entrants. It is critical that BT transforms its operating model to build a lean and agile organisation that delivers sustained improvement in customer experience and productivity.”

Chief Executive Gavin Patterson has said “BT was in a unique position, we have the UK’s leading fixed and mobile access networks, a portfolio of strong and well segmented brands, and close strategic partnerships. This position of strength will enable us to build on the disciplined delivery and risk reduction of the last financial year, a period in which we delivered overall in line with our financial and operational commitments whilst addressing many uncertainties.”

BT have made decisions to reduce costs by cutting jobs and relocating. Will this be enough to get the company back on track? Let us know what you think in the comments below.

Have a great weekend,

Warm regards,

Sheree

 

Sources: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-44065422

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-38728816

 

Employment Stats – April 2018

April 20, 2018 | By | No Comments

Good afternoon,

Happy Friday! At last we’ve seen some warm sunny weather this week, which means spring has finally arrived. All of us here at EGB are looking forward spending the weekend in the sun.

Earlier in the week, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) released the employment figures for the quarter Dec 2017 – Feb 2018, so for the blog this week, we will look at how the employment figures have changed since the end of 2017.

ONS have stated that employment figures are continuing to rise, with the employment rate for people aged between 16 – 64 years old at 75.4%, being at its highest since comparable records began in 1971. There are currently 32.26 million people in work, which is 55,000 more than the last quarter. Looking at records from this time in 2017, there are currently 427,000 more people in work, which is considerably higher.

Unemployment figures are also going the right way having dropped by 16,000 people since the last quarter and 136,000 less than this time last year. The unemployment rate has dropped from 4.7% to 4.2% in the last year, being the lowest since 1975.

Other figures that have been released by ONS are estimates showing that average weekly earnings have risen since last year. The average weekly earnings for employees in Great Britain have increased by 2.8% since last April and increased by 0.2% when price inflation is taken into account.

Looking into the public sector, there was a drop of 132,000 people employed, although this is down to the transfer of the English Housing associations to the private sector. Not taking this into consideration the public sector increased by 9,000 in the last quarter and increased by 44,000 over the last year.

It’s great to keep track of the employment figures and follow how they change every quarter and every year. The figures are continuing to go the right way and each quarter we are continuing to see improvements. We love the feeling of helping candidates find new positions, so it’s great to see the employment figures rising.

Have a great weekend.

Warm regards,

Sheree

 

Source: https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/employmentandemployeetypes/bulletins/uklabourmarket/april2018

 

 

Government upping efforts to get rid of unpaid Internships

February 16, 2018 | By | No Comments

Good afternoon,

I hope everyone has had a good week. Everyone in the office has been busy in the evenings this week, with Pancake Day on Tuesday and Valentines Day on Wednesday. Did you make any pancakes? Or maybe you went out for a meal on Wednesday? Let us know what you did in the comments.

Onto the blog for this week, we will be looking at how the government has upped their efforts to get rid of unpaid internships. Last month it was estimated that 40% of 70,000 internships undertaken were unpaid. According to the law, any interns that are classed as workers must be paid at least the National Minimum Wage or the National Living Wage. A worker would be “someone who has a contract or is subject to sanctions if they do not turn up for work” (not including genuine volunteers). No prosecutions have been made in relation to interns and the minimum wage yet, as employment law is not being enforced properly, but with the government stepping up, this could change.

Over the last few months, the government has been stepping up to sort the issue with HM Revenue and Customs writing to more than 500 firms reminding them that any interns classed as workers must be paid minimum wage. The government stated that they are working to remove exploitive unpaid internships as they should not exist. The government also stated: “We will take action to improve the interpretation of the law and the enforcement action taken by HMRC in this area to help stamp out illegal unpaid internships”. If the current approach does not work, the government will be “reviewing the existing policy and legal framework and will consider what other action can be taken”.

With unpaid internships, some candidates are at a disadvantage, as an internship may be the only path to take to get into the industry they want to work in, in the future. Individuals can potentially miss out on these opportunities as they cannot afford to take on a position unpaid. It is said that young workers need at least £1,019 per month when living in London and £827 when living in Manchester. This may leave some candidates at a disadvantage if they have no other financial support.

With the government starting to step up to resolve this issue, hopefully in the near future we will see an improvement on internships and hope to see the number of unpaid internships drop and eventually disappear. What is your opinion on unpaid internships? Do you think internships should be paid or unpaid? Let us know your opinion in the comments below.

Have a great weekend!

Warm Regards,

Sheree

 

Sources:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-42997400

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-42863951

Employment Stats – Feb 2018

February 2, 2018 | By | No Comments

Good afternoon,

We’ve had a very productive week this week and since the small changes that were made around the office (mentioned in last week’s blog), both Alex and Ellie have settled into their new positions nicely and have got stuck into the new work. How has everyone else’s week been? Have you been applying for any of our open roles? Don’t forget to check our website every day, as we receive new roles daily.

This week our blog will be looking at the update on employment statistics that have been released in the last week. Back in September last year we published a blog looking at the employment stats for the period: May – July 2017. Last week the Office for National Statistics released the figures for Sep – Nov 2017, so we will be looking at these to see how they have changed since the last quarter.

During Sep – Nov last year the employment rate (ages 16 – 64) was at 75.3%, the same as during the time period May – July 2017. Although there were 32.21 million people in work, which was 102,000 more than the previous months. Breaking it down into genders, 79.9% of men aged from 16 to 64 were in work, which is the highest employment rate for men since 1991, whilst 70.8% of women aged from 16 to 64 were in work, the joint highest since comparable records began in 1971.

The unemployment rate did not change much at all to the earlier months last year, remaining at 4.3%. This quarter we actually saw the number of people economically inactive drop by 79,000 totaling 8.73 million.

Although the figures haven’t changed too much since the last quarter, the results are still heading in the right direction, with employment on the rise and unemployment shrinking. The graph below shows how the figures have changed in the last quarter and against how they have changed in the last year.

(Source: Labour Force Survey, Office for National Statistics)

Also looking into the Public Sector stats (as the majority of our roles are through the public sector) since the last quarter there are 19,000 more people employed in the public sector and 21,000 more than the previous year.

It is always interesting looking at employment stats to see how things have changed over the past quarter and the last year. It is great to see that the employment rate is still climbing, bringing more and more people back into work every year. Later in the year we will take another look at how the stats have changed again and whether the employment rate is still on the rise.

Have a great weekend!

Warm regards,

Sheree

 

Source: https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/employmentandemployeetypes/bulletins/uklabourmarket/january2018